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Best Mechanical Pencil Eraser Refills 2018 – [Buyer’s Guide]

Last Updated December 1, 2018
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Billy JacobsI’m Willow Billy Jacobs. My friends call me “stone” and it just kind of stuck. After more than 32 hours of research and testing, which included using 11 different mechanical pencil eraser refills in five cities and interviewing product teams at five major companies, I made a list of the best mechanical pencil eraser refills of 2018

I have been writing about technology and entertainment since the early 90s from my secluded home in West Virginia. Now I’m going to recommend a few mechanical pencil eraser refills you can pick from to get started quickly and easily.

Let’s get to it!

Best Mechanical Pencil Eraser Refills of 2018

We’ve narrowed down our options based on the customer feedback (read positive reviews), functionality, material and size. In other words, we’ve put all fundamentals into consideration to come up with a comprehensive list that suits various needs. I’ve based my selection methodology on customer feedback, the size, functionality, and budget to meet various demands.

There is a wide range of products available on the market today, and below I have reviewed 3 of the very best options. Welcome to my website! If you plan to buy mechanical pencil eraser refills and looking for some recommendations, you have come to the right place.

Test Results and Ratings

Rank №1 №2 №3
Product
Total 4.8 4.5 4.3
Ease of use
5 points
5 points
4 points
Versatility
4 points
4 points
5 points
Durability
5 points
5 points
4 points
Value
5 points
4 points
4 points
Awards 1
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№1 – Paper Mate SharpWriter Mechanical Pencils

 
Paper Mate SharpWriter Mechanical Pencils

Pros
Mechanical pencil features shock-absorbing tip to reduce lead breakage
Twistable tip eliminates the need to stop and sharpen
#2 lead is perfect for standardized tests
Cons
Nothing, except that I wasted too much time making my choice.
 
Total:
4.8

Why did this mechanical pencil eraser refills win the first place?

I don’t know anything about other models from this brand, but I am fully satisfied with this product. I am very happy with the purchase. It is definitely worth its money. The product is top-notch! I really enjoy the design. It is compact, comfortable and reliable. And it looks amazing! The material is stylish, but it smells for the first couple of days.

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Ease of use
5

5star

Versatility
4

4star

Durability
5

5star

Value
5

5star

 

 

№2 – Paper Mate Write Bros Mechanical Pencils

 
Paper Mate Write Bros Mechanical Pencils

Pros
The longest leads available ease the stress of running out of lead
#2 pencil leads create neat notes and are ideal for standardized tests
Slim design is easy on your hands–ideal for classrooms, offices and homes
Cons
Heavier and thicker.
It is pretty expensive.
 
Total:
4.5

Why did this mechanical pencil eraser refills come in second place?

I recommend you to consider buying this model, it definitely worth its money. This is a pretty decent product that perfectly fitted the interior of our office. I really liked it. It is amazing in every aspect. It did even exceed my expectations for a bit, considering the affordable price. Seems that the material is good. It has a very beautiful color but I don’t really like the texture.

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Ease of use
5

5star

Versatility
4

4star

Durability
5

5star

Value
4

4star

 

 

№3 – Pentel Eraser Refills for Mechanical Pencils Pack of 15

 
Pentel Eraser Refills for Mechanical Pencils Pack of 15

Pros
Large latex-free white refill eraser for Champ, Icy, Icy Razzle-Dazzle, EZ#2, Cometz, .e-sharp, Quicker Clicker, Forté, Jolt
Five erasers per tube
One metal eraser holder included
Cons
The least durable frames we reviewed.
It is huge and heavy weight.
 
Total:
4.3

Why did this mechanical pencil eraser refills take third place?

The material is incredibly nice to the touch. It has a great color, which will suit any wallpapers. I liked the design. We’ve been using it for 2 months and it still looks like brand new. This price is appropriate since the product is very well built. It is inconvenient to use due to the size. I am going to get something different next time.

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Ease of use
4

4star

Versatility
5

5star

Durability
4

4star

Value
4

4star

 

 

Mechanical Pencil Eraser Refills Buyer’s Guide

If you keep the before points in mind, you can easily go out to the market and buy mechanical pencil eraser refills, right? No!

Push Button

Most mechanical pencils use a push button. The button is usually on the top of the pencil, but it can also be on the side of the pencil or even in the clip. Push buttons are so ubiquitous that even mechanical pencils with other mechanisms often have a push button as well.

A relatively recent addition to the mechanical pencil world is the shaker mechanism. With a shake of the pencil, a sliding internal weight activates an internal click mechanism to advance the lead.

Twist mechanisms advance and retract the lead with a turn of a knob, usually located in the top cap or nose cone of the pencil. This allows continuous adjustment of the lead, letting you choose the exact length of lead that you want. Twist mechanisms are particularly common among older mechanical pencils.

Automatic

With an automatic mechanical pencil, you don’t need to do anything to advance the lead. Once the lead is used down to the edge of the lead sleeve, the pressure of the paper on the lead sleeve activates a rachet mechanism that pushes out more lead.

Grip Section

For the best writing experience, a comfortable grip section is essential. Mechanical pencil grips come in a range of diameters and materials, and your individual preferences will determine what kind of grip will work best for you.

Diameter Mechanical pencil grips can vary widely in diameter. A wider grip may be best for those with larger hands or those suffering from arthritis, RSI, or other hand issues. People with smaller hands may prefer a narrower grip.

Material Mechanical pencil grips also vary in material. The most common materials are plastic, rubber, silicone, and metal, but more exotic materials like wood are also available.

Most mechanical pencils include a built-in eraser, but it’s usually quite small. For those who plan to regularly use their mechanical pencil’s eraser, we recommend choosing one with a generously sized, replaceable eraser.

Kokuyo FitCurve

The Kokuyo FitCurve is one of our all-time favorite mechanical pencils and a perfect choice for students. Its wide, firm rubber grip will keep hands comfortable during marathon note-taking sessions, and its replaceable, inch-long twist eraser will serve even the most error-prone of students. A sliding lead sleeve helps protect lead from breaking.

Pentel Sharp Kerry

One look at the Pentel Sharp Kerry is enough to show that is no ordinary mechanical pencil, and one use was all it took for us to be completely smitten. With its distinctive capped design, it might easily be mistaken for a fancy rollerball or fountain pen. A cleverly integrated button in the cap lets you extend the lead when the cap is posted. Removing the cap button reveals an eraser, and removing the button on the body of the pencil exposes the lead storage tube.

Uni Alpha Gel Kuru Toga

Among the ergonomic mechanical pencils we’ve tried, the Uni Alpha Gel Kuru Toga is easily our number one choice. Not only does the super-soft silicone Alpha Gel grip molds luxuriously to your fingers, the Kuru Toga mechanism keeps the lead sharp and consistent without the need to constantly rotate the pencil in your hand. You can even watch the mechanism spin through a small window in the barrel of the pencil.

Although not advertised anywhere on its packaging, we found that you can even customize the look of the pencil by unscrewing the clear plastic outer barrel and inserting a rolled piece of paper decorated however you want! You can read more about Kuru Toga pencils here.

Zebra DelGuard

The Zebra DelGuard utilizes an ingenious two-part system that makes it virtually impossible to break the lead without actively trying. A spring in the barrel of the pencil relieves pressure from the lead, while another spring in the tip dynamically extends the lead sleeve to reinforce the lead and prevent breakage. It sounds complicated, but we were blown away during our tests by how well it really works.

Pilot Delful

If you want to try out a shaker mechanical pencil, the Pilot Delful is a good place to start. The shaker mechanism works well and doesn’t require too much effort to activate. The tip retracts with a click of the top button to make the pencil pocket-safe. The shaker mechanism can still extend the lead when the tip is retracted, but the clutch is left disengaged so that any accidentally extended lead gets pushed back into the pencil.

Zebra Mini TS-3

For the absolute smallest mechanical pencil around, we recommend the Zebra Mini TS-At under inches in length and just 5.mm in diameter, it will slide inconspicuously into the smallest pocket or pen loop. It’s great for jotting down a quick note, but its short length and slender profile can make it a bit uncomfortable for those with larger hands.

How we picked

To find a set of pencils that would suit different people for different tasks, we took two routes. First, we talked to the experts. Much like with our piece on pens, we turned to the thriving network of pencil lovers and stationery bloggers who have spent more hands-on time with these things than anyone else. We talked to a half-dozen experts: Dave Pye of Dave’s Mechanical Pencils, Brad Dowdy of Pen Addict, Elizabeth Price of No Pen Intended, Brian Greene of OfficeSupplyGeek, Austin Smith of ArtSupplyCritic, and Johnny Gamber of Pencil Revolution. All told, these folks have been reviewing writing utensils for a combined 3years, which provides an unparalleled body of knowledge.

Our experts keyed us in on general advice for what to look for with pencils, and also led us to a number of very high-quality pencils with different strengths and weaknesses. So in order to figure out what to prioritize, we turned to our readers for help. We surveyed more than a thousand of our readers, and got data on what they looked for in a mechanical pencil, but also the type of mechanical pencil they already used, and what (if anything) they liked about the ones they had.

There’s a certain amount of bias in that survey—after all, the sort of person who wants to answer a survey about mechanical pencils probably already is not your average pencil user—but it gave us some great information on what people are already using.

A lot of the data we gathered played into personal preferences. Some people need a large eraser, a triangular grip, or a side clicker. Which tip shape do they prefer? Another factor to consider is the amount of play: There are mechanical pencils with slightly looser lead sheaths in their tips, which some say creates a smoother writing experience, while others insist that a pencil that’s firmer feels much more precise—see a discussion about “cushioned lead” here.

The results of our reader survey and expert interviews led us to a short list of pencils that were all but universally loved, and all for totally different reasons, which we then tested ourselves for overall feel.

Pull Quote

Each time you lift the pencil from the page, an internal ratcheting mechanism rotates the lead slightly, giving you a fresh surface.

A comparison of letters drawn using the Kuru Toga (top) versus an ordinary mechanical pencil after the same amount of writing. Image courtesy of Brian Greene of OfficeSupplyGeek.

With the Kuru Toga, each time you lift the pencil from the page, an internal ratcheting mechanism rotates the lead slightly, giving you a fresh surface. If you’re writing only a couple of lines, it’s not something you notice, but after a couple of pages of notes, you can really spot the difference—just look at the picture above! And if you look closely at the tinted plastic body of the pencil, you can even see markers along the shaft that show how much the Kuru Toga spins each time.

You can see how much the internal mechanism (the orange bit) has rotated after just a few short seconds of writing.

There are a couple of minor caveats to the rotational mechanism. It’s activated by pushing down on the page, so if you’re a very light writer, it might not rotate. And the actual rotation happens only once you lift your pencil, so it will happen less frequently for someone who writes in cursive than for someone who prints. Plus, since you’re always using the sharpest part of the lead, it tends to be a bit scratchier than other pencils—but that’s the price you pay for precision.

As for the pencil itself, it feels pretty standard. It has a fairly wide body to contain the mechanism for the constant lead rotation, and the grip is simply wavy plastic, though it’s solid and fairly comfortable. The pocket clip is functional, but it is made from cheap plastic and can’t be removed. The eraser is fairly small, but not the tiniest we’ve seen. Just based on the construction, there wouldn’t be much to make it special, but it’s that rotational mechanism that’s something else.

Dave Pye of Dave’s Mechanical Pencils, who is probably the most well-respected pencil reviewer on the Internet, got his hands on one way back in 200and showed off its efficacy against a standard pencil in short order. In an interview with us, we talked to him about our reader survey and what the responders thought was important, and he said the Kuru Toga was the best pick for most people based on those criteria, and he added, “The auto-rotating lead provides a real point of difference, something to think about whenever you use the pencil.”

Brad Dowdy of the Pen Addict complimented not just the rotation mechanism, but also the body, saying, “It is a fine mechanical pencil in its own right. The barrel is a sturdy plastic that feels like it can take a beating, and the clear grip, which is plastic as well, is surprisingly comfortable. The eraser is a little wobbly in action, but nothing too terrible.”

Pull Quote ”The barrel is a sturdy plastic that feels like it can take a beating, and the clear grip, which is plastic as well, is surprisingly comfortable.” –Brad Dowdy of Pen Addict

At the Atlantic, Steven Pool wrote about his love of mechanical pencils, and said of the Kuru Toga, “It was only on first trying a Kuru Toga that I realized I had for decades been unconsciously compensating for the chisel effect myself by turning the mechanical pencil in my fingertips every so often. That there was now no need to do so felt like a weird shift of perspective, a tiny Copernican revolution in my mechanical penciling.”

The Kuru Toga was also the favorite in our poll of more than a thousand readers. We asked the respondents if they already had a mechanical pencil that they liked, and of those who did, more than 1percent mentioned the Kuru Toga, surpassing any other pencil. Almost all of them

Drafting Pencil

For this post, I have put together a collection of the best drafting pencils currently available for purchase. 

Designed for professionals, these precision instruments use high-quality materials to allow you to do your best work. If cared for properly, these pencils should last a lifetime. 

Ballpoint Pens

The pen we all know and love. Ballpoint pens are probably the most widely used type of pen and are known for their reliability, availability, durability and reasonable prices. The pen functions with a small rotating ball – usually made from brass, steel or tungsten carbide, which ink clings to. The ball rotates as you write, leaving the ink on the paper while at the same time cleverly preventing the ink inside the reservoir from drying out.

The ink used in a ballpoint is generally oil-based viscous ink which is quick drying, will write on most surfaces and comes in a wide range of colours. The thicker ink in these pens can sometimes dry out on the ball when not in use but a quick scribble will usually get the ink flowing again.

Ballpoints come in a range of tip sizes – fine, medium and bold to suit your needs and satisfy your personal preference whether in the office, at school or for personal use at home.

Both disposable and refillable ballpoints are available.

Rollerball Pens

Rollerballs work in the same way a ballpoint does, but using thinner water-based ink so that the effect on paper is similar to that of a fountain pen. The low viscosity ink in a rollerball flows freely with little pressure required whilst writing. This helps reduce the risk of tired or aching hands after a lengthy writing session.

Ink from a rollerball tends take a little longer to dry and may bleed through some of the more absorbent types of paper so a little extra care may be needed, although that’s a small price to pay for the superb, professional looking lines that can be created with these pens. As the ink in a rollerball flows more freely than the ink in a ballpoint, the lifespan of the refill may be shorter.

Rollerballs will either be retractable or they will come with a lid. Ensure the lid is placed on the pen when not in use, to prevent the pen from drying out. Rollerballs start off at a reasonable price and many are refillable so you never need to be parted from your favourite pen. Tip sizes vary from super fine to bold. Which size you choose simply comes down to personal preference and depends on the type of work you will use your pen for.

Fine liners

Fineliners have a fine tip which is ideal for creating those slightly more delicate lines. Whether it’s sketching, illustrating or writing that you’re into – or anything else which requires attention to detail, for that matter. A fineliner gives handwriting a crisper, clearer look, especially small handwriting. Fineliners come in a range of different colours and the line widths tend to be under 0.7mm, with the finest being 0.3mm.

Technical Pens

If you’re looking for that perfect finish, technical pens are available to do just that. These pens are favoured by architects, draughtsmen and engineers. They give a precise line and are ideal for use on a range of surfaces, including tracing paper, vellum drawing paper and line board. Most technical pens are refillable with replacement nibs often available. They come in a variety of line widths ranging from the superfine 0.mm to a much thicker 1.0mm. You could opt for one of our Rotring sets which contain the basics to get you started.

Fountain Pens

Fountain pens are viewed by many as being one of the most luxurious ways to put pen to paper. They work using gravity and capillary action to get the ink through the feed and onto the paper via the nib. Fountain pens offer a smooth continuous ink flow and very little pressure is needed when writing.

The nibs are usually made from stainless steel or gold and are available in a range of sizes: fine, medium and bold. The more expensive fountain pens come in beautiful designs which are often considered treasured items by their owners.

The methods of getting ink into a fountain pen vary, although the easiest and most convenient way is via a replaceable cartridge. Other refill methods use bottled ink which, although they offer a wider range of inks and colours, are less convenient for using on the go. When you’ve found the fountain pen you wish to purchase, it’s always a good idea to research which method it uses to ensure it is compatible with your lifestyle and requirements.  

Disposable fountain pens are also available and are suitable for everyday use. These pens are not refillable but still provide you with a smooth, enjoyable writing experience. They come with an iridium ball nib and sizes range from 0.7mm to 0.3mm. The Pentel JM20 has a duel sided nib in sizes from 0.3mm to 0.4mm, allowing you to adjust it to suit your own personal preference and style.

Highlighters

These pens are used for highlighting text and come in bright fluorescent colours, bringing text to the attention of the reader with ease. Most highlighters have a chiselled tip which produces a broad line through the text but can be used to achieve a finer line when underlining. Line widths range from 1mm to 5mm, making highlighting text of any size an easy task.

OHP Pens

Over-head projector (OHP) pens are designed to write on OHP film but are also suitable to use on most other glossy surfaces.

OHP pens offer both a permanent and non-permanent option. If you’re looking to make your presentation colourful and eye-catching you could opt for one of our assorted colour packs which include some, or all, of the following colours: black, blue, red, orange, green, brown, purple and yellow. You can choose from a wide range of line widths, including: 0.4mm, 0.6mm, 0.8mm, 1mm and 3mm.

Pencils

Pencils are made from a mixture of graphite and clay which is then placed into a protective casing, most commonly wood, or in the case of a mechanical pencil – plastic or metal.

However, a pencil is not just a pencil. Any artist who uses pencils regularly will be interested in the hardness of the lead, which ranges from hard (2H, 3H, 4H, 5H, 6H, 7H, 8H, 9H,) to black (B, 2B, 3B, 4B, 5B, 6B, 7B, 8B, 9B). HB is the most common type of pencil, used for most everyday writing tasks. 9H is the hardest and will leave the lightest mark on paper, while 9B is the softest and will leave the darkest mark on paper.

Colouring pens and pencils

A popular drawing tool for both children and adults, colouring pencils are available in either round or hexagonal barrels. You can choose from the standard colouring pencil or the blendable colouring pencil which helps you create those softer edges, and water colour pencils which give your creations a stunning water colour paint effect when brush strokes of water are added.

We also stock long lasting felt tip pens that come in both broad and fine tips, available in a vast range of colours.  These are washable, making them the ideal choice for school children, whether in the classroom or at home.

Crayons are particularly suitable for children as they are hard wearing, cover large areas and will not create any unwanted mess. They can be sharpened so you can keep them in tip top condition and are also erasable. They are available in a range of bright, eye catching colours …. Let those imaginations run wild.

Refills

Everyone has their one special pen – their first choice when they dip into the pen pot. Once you’ve found yours, you’ll want to know how to refill it so that you can use it for ever and ever and ever….

We stock a selection of refills including Parker, Waterman, Cross and Rotring. Refills are available for ballpoints, rollerballs and technical pens. Fountain pen refills are available in the form of both cartridges and bottled ink.

Either check the packaging, or look at the refill inside your pen to find out which type your pen requires. Most ballpoints, rollerballs and gel pens simply need to be unscrewed for refill purposes. Take care when refilling so you don’t lose any springs or other small parts that the pen may contain.

Refilling a fountain pen which uses a disposable cartridge is straight forward. The cartridge is simply pushed on, piercing the top and allowing the ink to escape. Check the packaging to find out which cartridges are compatible with your pen.

The refill process can sometimes be a little more complicated (or more fun, depending on how you look at it) with a fountain pen which uses bottled ink. These fountain pens may need to be filled via the piston mechanism, which uses suction, or manually via a syringe.

Choosing the line width

The line width you choose for your pen will depend on personal preference and the type of work you intend to use your pen for. Line widths range from a very thin 0.1mm on fineliners, all the way up to a 14.8mm on pens such as markers. The average size of a medium point pen is around 0.7mm or 0.8mm, so that’s a good starting point when deciding how thick or thin you’d like your lines to be.

Forward

Zebra Disposable Brush Pen – Super Fine Brush pens are great tools for manga artists as well as calligraphers. Convenient and perfect for on the go travel, these pens offer lush black color and varying lines widths depending on applied pressure.

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Mechanical Pencil Eraser Refills by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your Mechanical Pencil Eraser Refills wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of Mechanical Pencil Eraser Refills

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about Mechanical Pencil Eraser Refills is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



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