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Best Pen Refills 2018 – [Buyer’s Guide]

Last Updated December 1, 2018
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Billy JacobsHELLO! I’m Billy Jacobs. After more than 50 hours of research and testing, which included using 18 different pen refills in five cities and interviewing product teams at five major companies, I made a list of the best pen refills of 2018

In this article, I will be categorizing the items according to their functions and most typical features. You see I’m an average member of the public just like you and the main reason I decided to publish a review website on pen refills is because I was looking for one not so long ago.

Best Pen Refills of 2018

I am going to specify each good-to-buy feature as much as possible for your references. Here we have compiled a detailed list of some of the best pen refills of the 2018. There’s a product for every kind of user on the list of affordable options below. The best pen refills will make your fairytale dreams come true!

Test Results and Ratings

Rank №1 №2 №3
Product
Total 4.8 4.5 4.3
Ease of use
5 points
5 points
4 points
Materials
5 points
4 points
4 points
Performance
5 points
5 points
4 points
Quality
4 points
4 points
5 points
Awards 1
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№1 – 3D Pen Filament Refills – 50 STENCIL EBOOK & BONUS GLOW IN THE DARK COLOR INCLUDED – 1.75mm ABS – 240 Linear Feet Total of 12 Different Colors in 20 Foot Lengths

 
3D Pen Filament Refills - 50 STENCIL EBOOK & BONUS GLOW IN THE DARK COLOR INCLUDED - 1.75mm ABS - 240 Linear Feet Total of 12 Different Colors in 20 Foot Lengths

Pros
✓ 12 UNIQUE COLORS & 50 STENCIL EBOOK- This sample pack comes with a great variety of 12 different colors that includes a BONUS glow-in-the-dark color to give you more options when creating your artistic masterpiece. You will also receive an E-Book of 50 count 3D Pen Stencils!!! You will receive 30 3-Dimensional stencils and 20 2-Dimensional stencils. Don’t miss out on this fun sampler pack and ebook!
Cons
For such a price and the level of quality it can’t even have any cons, only pick holes.
 
Total:
4.8

Why did this pen refills win the first place?

I really enjoy the design. It is compact, comfortable and reliable. And it looks amazing! I don’t know anything about other models from this brand, but I am fully satisfied with this product. The product is very strong. Its material is stable and doesn’t crack. I was completely satisfied with the price. Its counterparts in this price range are way worse.

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Ease of use
5

5star

Materials
5

5star

Performance
5

5star

Quality
4

4star

 

 

№2 – 3D Pen for Kids with 7.5M long 1.75MM PLA – 2017 Tipeye Newest RED Version 3D Doodler Pen Kits 3D Printing Pen with LCD Display PLA Filament Refills for Adults

 
3D Pen for Kids with 7.5M long 1.75MM PLA - 2017 Tipeye Newest RED Version 3D Doodler Pen Kits 3D Printing Pen with LCD Display PLA Filament Refills for Adults

Pros
🎄【Normal Temperature 3D pen】Compatible with Both ABS & PLA Filament – The Aircraft-grade aluminum 3D drawing pen is suitable for both 1.75mm ABS & PLA Filament. PLA Filament is non-toxic and odorless,safer than ABS, and tend to be widely-used filaments.Please do not use with PCL filament.
Cons
Can be tedious to clean up.
Limited official sellers leave room for fakes.
 
Total:
4.5

Why did this pen refills come in second place?

Seems that the material is good. It has a very beautiful color but I don’t really like the texture. This is a pretty decent product that perfectly fitted the interior of our office. I really liked it. It is amazing in every aspect. It did even exceed my expectations for a bit, considering the affordable price. I recommend you to consider buying this model, it definitely worth its money.

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Ease of use
5

5star

Materials
4

4star

Performance
5

5star

Quality
4

4star

 

 

№3 – 4.5 in

 
4.5 in

Pros
Refill length: 4.5 in ( 11.6cm )
Black ink, medium point, smooth writing.
Whole refills are made of metal material.
Cons
It is huge and heavy weight.
Extremely expensive.
 
Total:
4.3

Why did this pen refills take third place?

It doesn’t squeaks nor bents. Looks great in my apartment. A very convenient model. It is affordable and made of high-quality materials. It is inconvenient to use due to the size. I am going to get something different next time. I liked the design. We’ve been using it for 2 months and it still looks like brand new.

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Ease of use
4

4star

Materials
4

4star

Performance
4

4star

Quality
5

5star

 

 

Pen Refills Buyer’s Guide

If you keep the before points in mind, you can easily go out to the market and buy pen refills, right? No!

Barrel Width

AS a vague rule of thumb, pens get fatter as they get more expensive – consider the 13mm Parker Premier and the 14mm Laban Mento. The most popular pens measure 9-11mm, whilst the 6mm Ohto Slimline is ideal for tucking inside a journal or bag

Fashion meets function. Consider Parker’s iconic arrow, or the Laban set with Swarovski crystals. Brands such as Otto Hutt use spring-loaded clips which clamp down to prevent the pen getting lost

If your pen’s only to be used for the occasional signature, consider Platinum’s ‘Slip and Seal’ cap which prevents ink drying for up to two years without use.

Cross Ballpoint Refill

Cross ballpoint refills are brand specific and screw into place within the ballpoint. This screw fixing means the ballpoint mechanism can work without the need for a loose internal spring so there will be no worries about losing part of your pen when changing refills.

STANDARD INTERNATIONAL BALLPOINT

Compatible with Coles, Diplomat, Faber-Castell, Graf von Faber-Castell, Laban, Ohto, Online, Otto Hutt, Parker, USUS.

Known as the ‘G2′ within the pen industry this is the Industry standard size. It is more commonly known as the ‘Parker-Style’ ballpoint refill.

Medium point refills

Medium writing point refills are the standard for this type and most pens will be fitted with this writing point width at purchase. The writing point is 1mm wide. Being the most standard size means there are many options of manufacturers to choose from for your refills.

Euro-format Rollerball Refills

Compatible with Coles, Diplomat, Faber-Castell, Graf von Faber-Castell, Laban, Ohto, Online, Otto Hutt, Platinum, Sheaffer, Waterman, Worther, Yard-o-Led.

The Euro-format rollerball refill is similar to a standard in that a lot of brands use a euro-format. The only issue is that although very similar and most can be used across the different brands they vary slightly. Some have a wider tip. Some have a small ‘step’ where the tip section meets the barrel.

All this means that if you have a pen which suits Euro-format rollerball refills it is best to use the manufacturer’s own refills. That said if you’re feeling risky there’s plenty of options to choose from which will most likely fit.

Waterman ballpoint refills are brand specific.

Waterman has an excellent history of ink based innovation and they have continued this trend in creating some great ballpoint refills, which are long lasting and have a smooth consistent writing style.

Yard-o-Led standard size ballpoint refills

The Yard-o-Led Standard ballpoint refill will fit Diplomat, Deco, Deluxe, Perfecta, Regent and Viceroy ranges. Except the pocket size pens these need the pocket twist size refill.

The pocket twist is the same size as standard multifunction refills.

Standard multifunction pen refills

Compatible with Caran d’Ache, Cross, Laban, Lamy, Ohto, Online, Parker, Platinum, Worther, Yard-o-Led.

Known as the ‘D1′ within the pen industry, this is the industry standard size for multi-function and mini pens. These refills are usually made of metal and have a hollow end. Generally these are miniaturised ballpoint refills, utilising oil based ink.

As lots of brands manufacture their own there is a wide range to choose from and even some great colours and styles; like the Lamy M5Marker Refill, which works like a highlighter.

And then there’s using a fountain pen.

Putting aside one’s ballpoint and picking up a fountain pen is akin to making the switch from shaving with a cartridge razor to using a safety or straight razor. The nature of the tool requires more skill and attention on your part, but the experience is richer and the result sharper.

If you’ve always wanted to see what it’s like to literally get the ink flowing, this article offers an accessible primer on the basics you need to know to get started.

A Brief History of Fountain Pens

While the earliest record of a fountain-like pen dates from the 10th century, fountain pens as we know them today didn’t exist until the late 19th century. In 1884, an American named Lewis Waterman patented the first practical model after supposedly having a sales contract ruined by a leaky precursor. Before Waterman’s version, fountain pens were plagued with ink spills and blots, and were unreliable and inconvenient.

Waterman solved this airflow issue by cutting a series of three fissures in the pen’s feed. This created a capillary-esque mechanism that functioned by drawing ink into these small channels at the same time that air came back in over the fissures and entered the reservoir. The modern fountain pen was born.

Though Waterman’s innovation made fountain pens much more effective and convenient to write with, filling the pen remained a messy and tedious affair. You had to unscrew a portion of the barrel and use an eyedropper to fill the reservoir drop by drop. At the turn of the 20th century, companies began introducing self-filling reservoirs that allowed users to put the nib in the inkbottle and fill the reservoir by pulling a lever or twisting the barrel.

Despite the introduction of the ballpoint pen in the early 1900s, fountain pens maintained their dominance as the go-to writing instrument up until the mid-point of the century. It was not until the 1960s, when the ballpoint pen’s reliability increased, and its price decreased, that fountain pen sales began their long and steady decline in the United States. While they’re still widely used by students in private schools in England and the rest of Europe, in America the fountain pen is largely seen as more of a collector’s item, a status symbol, or the focus of a twee hobby. However, thanks to the internet’s ability to connect enthusiasts, the fountain pen has seen something of a resurgence in the U.S. Today you can find countless forums and blogs dedicated to the virtues of this classic writing instrument.

Why Write With a Fountain Pen

Think you might like to branch out from your ballpoint? Here are a few reasons to give fountain pens a try:

It feels better. Because you don’t have to press down as hard to write as you do with a ballpoint pen, writing with the fountain variety is much easier on the hand. It allows for extended periods of writing without fatigue. It’s easier to get in the flow, when using something that truly flows.

It’s better for the environment. With a ballpoint pen, once you use up all the ink, you toss it into the trash. While you can buy disposable fountain pens, most fountain pens aren’t meant to be thrown away. When you run out of ink, just refill the reservoir and you’re back in business.

More economical in the long run. I don’t want to think about the amount of money I’ve thrown away or lost in the form of half-used ballpoint pens. Because of their disposable nature, I’m pretty careless with them. If I lose one, oh well, I can buy a whole new pack of ‘em.

There’s something about a fountain pen that inspires you to take care of it. The hefty price tag of some models certainly has something to do with that. But the fountain pen’s storied tradition provides an aura of timelessness and permanence that encourages the owner to safeguard it; it may even become a family heirloom.

The result is that, besides the initial investment of the pen, the only recurring expense you’ll accrue is just buying more ink every now and then. Consequently, you save money in the long run with a fountain pen compared to a ballpoint.

It makes cursive handwriting look better. Besides reducing fatigue, the light touch and flowing hand movements that are necessitated by a fountain pen make your handwriting look better.

Notice the slit down the middle and the breather hole.

The nib is the metal tip of the fountain pen that touches the paper. Early fountain pen nibs were fashioned from gold due to the element’s flexibility and resistance to corrosion. However, most modern nibs are made with stainless steel or gold alloys because of their strength and durability.

If a nib is made from pure gold, it’s usually tipped with a hard-wearing metal like iridium or some metal from the platinum family. Steel nibs already have a hard tip, so tipping them with another metal isn’t necessary.

Along the center of the nib runs a small slit that helps bring ink down the tip by way of the aforementioned capillary action. You’ll also find a “breather hole” bored into the top of the nib to help bring air back into the reservoir to prevent a vacuum from forming. The breather hole also serves a structural purpose by acting as a stress-relieving point, which helps prevent the nib from cracking with the repeated flexing that occurs during use.

Nibs come in varying tip shapes and grades. The three basic shapes are round, stub, and italic. Round is the most common shape and provides a fairly uniform-looking line on the paper. Stub and italic nibs are typically used in calligraphy.

Nib grades designate the size of the tip. Five basic grades exist: extra fine (XF), fine (F), medium (M), broad (B), and double broad (BB). The most common nib grades are fine and extra fine.

Reservoir or Filling Systems

The reservoir is the cavity inside the fountain pen that holds the ink. This part has seen the most innovations over the course of the pen’s evolution. We could devote an entire article to the various types of reservoirs and filling systems that you can find on antique fountain pens, but for the purposes of this article, we’ll stick to the most common ones you’ll find in modern models:

Cartridge. This is the most common type of reservoir in fountain pens today. A cartridge is a small, sealed disposable plastic tube that holds the fountain pen ink. When a cartridge runs out of ink, you simply remove the old cartridge and put in a new one. The main benefit of cartridge reservoirs is the convenience. The downside is that you often have to rely on the propriety cartridge made for your particular pen. Consequently, your choices of ink will be more limited. Also, there’s the cost factor. While cartridges aren’t too expensive, refilling your pen yourself can save you money in the long run.

Converter. If you don’t like the idea of having to buy new cartridges every time you run out of ink, consider buying a cartridge converter for your fountain pen. A cartridge converter looks pretty much like a cartridge and can fit most cartridge pens, but it has a filling mechanism that allows you to refill it with ink whenever you run out. The upside is that you open yourself up to a variety of inks to use, the downside is convenience; while it’s not hard to fill your cartridge converter, it’s certainly more of a hassle than simply throwing away an old cartridge and installing a new one. Here’s how to fill a cartridge converter.

How to Write With a Fountain Pen

Post your cap (or not). Posting your cap means putting the cap on the end of your pen while you’re writing. The pen usually feels more balanced in the hand when you have it posted. Of course, some folks prefer to write with the cap set aside. Experiment and find what works for you.

Hold it at the correct angle. The pen should make a 40 to 55-degree angle with your writing surface. A fountain pen’s “sweet spot” is usually in this range, as ink flows more easily at these angles. The exception is a pen with a round nib; in this case, you want the nib’s top to point straight up and not be rotated to either side.

Use less pressure. You don’t need to press down to get the ink to flow like you do with a ballpoint pen. In fact, too much pressure can prevent the ink from flowing properly or can damage the nib. Keep your strokes light.

Use your arm. Most people are “finger writers,” meaning that they just move their fingers to write. Finger writing has a tendency to cause you to apply too much pressure to the pen, which rotates it and in turn causes ink flow problems. Instead, focus on using your shoulder and arm more while you’re writing. It will feel weird at first, but this style of writing keeps your nib steady and helps reduce the pressure on it.

How to Take Care of Your Fountain Pen

Don’t let others borrow your pen. As you use your pen, the nib will adapt to your writing style. If you let someone else borrow it for extended periods and apply their own style to it, the nib can get out of whack. If they just need to sign something, let them borrow it; it’s a gentlemanly gesture. If they need to write an essay, lend them a cheap-o ballpoint.

Give your pen a regular flush. It’s recommended that you give your fountain pen a flush once a month. It ensures proper ink flow by removing any build-up in the nib or feed. Here’s how you do it.

In addition to flushing, you might consider soaking your nib in a cup of cool water overnight to remove any stubborn ink build-up.

The Fountain Pen Network.

A forum dedicated to fountain pens. The folks there are super helpful with beginners, so if you have a question, ask. They also have lists of groups, meetings and events dedicated to fountain penning (yeah, I just used fountain pen as a verb), as well as a marketplace where you can buy or trade new fountain pens.

Some Basic Definitions

I could write a whole glossary just on the terms and terminology used in the fountain pen world, but that’s not my goal here. My goal is simply to give you the most basic definitions you’ll need to understand the rest of this article. I want to focus on things that someone who doesn’t know much about fountain pens wouldn’t know, while not getting into details that are unnecessary for someone just getting started.

The nib

The nib is the part of the pen that touches the paper, and that the ink comes out of. On most pens it will be stainless steel, and on higher end pens it will be gold. By changing a nib, you can completely change the experience of writing with a pen. One of the first decisions you’ll have to make when buying a fountain pen is the size of the nib’s tip.

On most standard fountain pens, nibs can come in various points from extra fine to bold. The tip of the nib will determine just how much ink is released, and the thickness of the lines that you will put down. In addition to extra fine to bold, there are also a variety of other nib types like a cursive italic, or a stub. These special grinds are best suited for specific handwriting styles.

To further complicate matters, nib sizes aren’t standard. A “fine” nib on a Japanese pen, will tend to be finer than a “fine” nib on a German pen.

Certain nibs work better with certain inks, and certain handwriting styles.

Nibs made of softer materials, like gold, will wear in such a way as to adapt to the handwriting of the person using it. As such, if you have a very soft nib on a pen, and you lend it to someone else, the ink flow will seem strange to them, because the pen will have literally adapted itself to you.

Converter

A converter changes a cartridge filling system into refillable solution. There are various types of converters and filling systems, but the main purpose remains the same: a refillable reservoir that holds the ink that your pen uses to write. Some pens come with converters, others need to be ordered. For instance, a Pilot Metropolitan comes with both a cartridge and an empty converter, whereas a Lamy Safari comes only with a cartridge. If you want to refill a Safari, you either need to buy more cartridges, or you need to buy a converter plus ink.

Get Used to Writing With It

The day I got my Lamy Safari, I started using it immediately. Admittedly, my first impression was less than stellar. I found the pen scratchy to write with, and found that it was skipping. I began to wonder if I was doing something wrong, and then questioned whether getting a fine nib might have been a mistake.

I stuck to it, and a few hours into taking notes with my pen, somethign magical happened: the ink started to flow better!

This was my first fountain pen lesson. The way a fountain pen works is different from the way a ballpoint or a gel ink pen works. Pen doesn’t just start flowing automatically. The ink needs to work its way through the entire nib. In addition, if ink has been sitting in the pen for a while, it may have dried slightly, which will give you a less smooth writing experience. In general, using it will allow you to get through the drier ink and then it will start to flow.

As I continued to write with my fountain pen, the more I found I liked it.

Try it on Different Papers

As I started using my new pen, I began to notice something that I had never really taken stock of using my old ballpoints or gel pens: paper quality. I soon found that some papers worked great with my pen, while others made it feel scratchy, or caused the ink to bleed.

You can read exhaustive articles on which paper is the best to try with what ink and pen combination. However, my best advice is to try a bunch of different things.

Write on whatever plain pad of paper you have lying around the office. Write on post-it notes. Write in your favourite notebook. Write on scraps of paper.

You’ll soon get a feel for the difference that paper can make.

Brad recently wrote a great piece for Rhodia about how paper is like the tires on a car, and it’s true. You don’t really notice what kind of tires are on your car until you have a high performance car that can take advantage of them. The fountain pen is a little bit like the high performance car.

Returning to my car analogy, it’s kind of like having your every day tires for the commute to work, and saving your performance tires for the track on weekends.

Notice the Colours

One of the great things about fountain pens, and refilling them is the sheer variety of different colours. It’s not unusual for a single ink company to produce a few dozen colours. And before you think that after a few primary colours, all other inks are just variations of the same thing, you are missing a huge part of the ink experience. It is only when I started using fountain pens that I started to truly understand what it meant to appreciate an ink’s texture and depth of colour.

Even the standard blue that came with my Lamy Safari had more variation and depth than any other ink I’d ever written with before.

The moment you start getting excited about watching the ink of your pen dry, that’s when you know you’re hooked. So, at this point, I would suggest that you buy at least one ink refill.

Try Different Inks

Before you spend a fortune on a Nakaya or some other crazy expensive pen, realize just how much fun you can have just by trying different inks.

In my mind, inks are a seriously under-appreciated part of the fountain pen experience. Most articles you will read about fountain pens focus on the pens (with good reason, it is what you’re using to write!). However, changing the ink in your pens is a more affordable way to get a great variety of experiences with your fountain pen.

Think about it. Instead of spending multiple hundreds of dollars on new pens, you can spend a few bucks on a new bottle of ink, ink your favourite pen, and boom, just like that, whole new writing experience!

Closing Words

At this point, you’re probably thinking to yourself, this all seems like a lot just to buy a pen. And you’re right. It is. However, if you just want a pen that you can pull out at any time and it just works, then I’d suggest grabbing a roller ball or a gel pen. There’s a ton of great ones out there, and you can read through Brad’s reviews to find the best of the best. If you’re looking for a utilitarian tool, that’s the way to go.

However, if you’re approaching fountain pens as a piece of art, a hobby, or worse, a potential addiction, I think it’s worth taking the time to understand the basics with a few of the cheaper options before diving head first into the vast selection of premium pens that exist out there.

Tip Size

The tip size of a nib determines how wide a line it will make. They are typically rated from narrowest to widest as extra fine, fine, medium, or broad. Japanese fountain pens typically write about a size finer than an equivalent pen from a non-Japanese brand. For example, a Pilot medium nib will write about the same as a Kaweco fine nib. People with smaller handwriting should choose a fine or extra fine nib, while those with larger handwriting may prefer a medium or broad nib.

Tip Shape

Nib tips can be either round or shaped. Most are round, meaning that they create the same line width in any direction—just like a regular ballpoint pen. Shaped nibs will have different line widths depending on the direction of the stroke. The most common type of shaped nib is italic, which makes wide vertical strokes and a thin horizontal strokes. If you are new to fountain pens, we recommend picking a nib with a round tip.

Built-In Filling System

Other fountain pens use built-in filling systems like a piston or vacuum mechanism. These pens can be filled straight from a bottle and typically have a much larger ink capacity than a cartridge or converter. On the other hand, they can’t be used with cartridges, so you’ll need to have an ink bottle on hand when they do run out of ink.

Eyedropper

With eyedropper pens, the barrel of the pen itself serves as the ink reservoir. As the name suggests, eyedropper pens are filled using an eyedropper or syringe. They can hold far more ink than any other type of pen. Very few pens are built to be used as eyedroppers, but many cartridge fountain pens can be converted into eyedropper pens by following a few simple steps.

For an in-depth, hands-on look at the different kinds of fountain pen filling systems, check out our video here.

Going Deeper

These pens are ideal for anyone who has used fountain pens for a while and is looking for something a little nicer or more interesting. This is the point where fountain pens really start to branch out and take on their own distinctive styles. They can offer better styling, better build quality, and other cool features like a built-in filling system or all-metal construction.

Sailor 1911L Large

Length Capped : 5.5625″Length Uncapped : 4.875″Length with Cap Posted : 6.125″Diameter at Section : 0.45″Diameter at Cap Band : 0.63″Weight : 0.9ozNib : 21k GoldFilling Mechanism : Cartridge / Converter

Take a hands-on look to see how the 191Standard and Large match up with one another in our video comparison below. 

In the video, Tom uses a Pelikan M600 to compare against the 191Standard. Hopefully, this would help in establishing a point of reference for those who are unfamiliar with the Sailor brand. Although the 1911L is “larger” than the Standard, the size is still quite manageable for both men and women to handle and write with.

Choosing a Nib Size

As with any Sailor fountain pen, the main attraction is the NIB. The Japanese pen maker is dedicated to the finely crafted art of writing. Each nib is given the proper attention to ensure that writing quality is consistent and exceeding expectations. Seven different types of nibs are available standard.

With many pen manufacturers paring down their nib selection to 2-choices (usually fine, medium or broad), it might seem a little intimidating that you would have to choose between possible nibs. Hopefully, we can shed some light on the subject so you would be able to make an informed decision on which nib is “write” for you.

In general, Japanese nibs tend to run thinner than their Western counterparts. That means a Western extra-fine is equivalent to a Japanese fine/medium.  With that being said, Sailor offers extra-fine, fine, medium-fine, medium, broad, music, and zoom nibs. Watch our nib comparison video below to see these nibs in action and compared with some Western-style nibs to see the subtle differences in line width.

Approximately, this is what you could expect from a Sailor nib if you are familiar with Western nibs:

Western Broad -> Sailor ZoomWestern Medium -> Sailor BroadWestern Fine -> Sailor MediumWestern Extra-Fine -> Sailor Fine

The extra-fine size is so thin, it does not have any Western analog. The Zoom is also a unique offering, as it lays down a different line width based on the angle that the nib touches the paper. Writing at an acute angle produces the thickest, wettest line possible, which is thicker than the Sailor broad. Writing at an angle that is perpendicular to the page will yield a line of medium thickness. 

The Music nib is not a traditional, three-tined music nib. It does have a thick downstroke that results in the broadest line possible with a Sailor pen, while the horizontal line is a thinner, medium size. Although the original intention of the Music nib is to write music, most writers who opt to own one of these pens seldom use it for that purpose. The shape of the nib instantly gives your handwriting a flair of line variation it did not have previously. The nib performs beautifully upside down as well, laying down a drier, thinner line for more concise writing.

The uni-ball Jetstream.

The response from the experts was unanimous: when it comes to a great pen for every day and everybody, you should get the uni-ball Jetstream.

The response from the experts was unanimous: when it comes to a great pen for every day and everybody, you should get the uni-ball Jetstream. It has a perfect combination of incredibly smooth, incredibly even ink; it dries quickly; it comes in a wide variety of shapes and sizes; and it has excellent durability.

Brian of Office Supply Geek said “I think the Jetstream line is the winner when it comes to an everyday pen for the masses. It dominates in its super smooth and solidly consistent performance, it dries very quickly, and provides all of the security benefits of being tamper resistant.”

In a review of the 0.mm version, Brian said “When I first wrote with this pen I was very surprised by how smooth the ink flowed, and how effortlessly the pen glided across the paper. I almost felt like if I didn’t focus on controlling the movements of the pen on the paper, I would end up experiencing something similar to what happens when you hydroplane in a car. It really was amazing to me that I was writing with a ballpoint pen “super super smooth” and saying it “is just the best ballpoint that I have ever written with, and it pretty much makes me want to toss every other ballpoint pen that I have on my desk because it will just be disappointing if I ever have to use one of them again.”

He complimented the 10Bold for its comfortable grip and being ideal for left-handers. “As with any Jetstream I’ve ever used, these write flawlessly with no skipping or clumping, and the flow was steady and consistent. The most impressive thing about them though came when I tested the dry time, which is what I think makes these pens such an attractive pen for left handed writers.”

The Pen Addict called the Jetstream 10version “almost obscenely smooth,” saying he’s “hopelessly hooked for life” on the entire Jetstream lineup. He mentioned the 0.3mm version is “one of my favorite pens ever”, noting that it’s not too scratchy despite the tiny tip and “it’s hard to believe that a pen this fine can write this smooth.”

Ballpoint Pens

The pen we all know and love. Ballpoint pens are probably the most widely used type of pen and are known for their reliability, availability, durability and reasonable prices. The pen functions with a small rotating ball – usually made from brass, steel or tungsten carbide, which ink clings to. The ball rotates as you write, leaving the ink on the paper while at the same time cleverly preventing the ink inside the reservoir from drying out.

The ink used in a ballpoint is generally oil-based viscous ink which is quick drying, will write on most surfaces and comes in a wide range of colours. The thicker ink in these pens can sometimes dry out on the ball when not in use but a quick scribble will usually get the ink flowing again.

Ballpoints come in a range of tip sizes – fine, medium and bold to suit your needs and satisfy your personal preference whether in the office, at school or for personal use at home.

Both disposable and refillable ballpoints are available.

Rollerball Pens

Rollerballs work in the same way a ballpoint does, but using thinner water-based ink so that the effect on paper is similar to that of a fountain pen. The low viscosity ink in a rollerball flows freely with little pressure required whilst writing. This helps reduce the risk of tired or aching hands after a lengthy writing session.

Ink from a rollerball tends take a little longer to dry and may bleed through some of the more absorbent types of paper so a little extra care may be needed, although that’s a small price to pay for the superb, professional looking lines that can be created with these pens. As the ink in a rollerball flows more freely than the ink in a ballpoint, the lifespan of the refill may be shorter.

Rollerballs will either be retractable or they will come with a lid. Ensure the lid is placed on the pen when not in use, to prevent the pen from drying out. Rollerballs start off at a reasonable price and many are refillable so you never need to be parted from your favourite pen. Tip sizes vary from super fine to bold. Which size you choose simply comes down to personal preference and depends on the type of work you will use your pen for.

Fine liners

Fineliners have a fine tip which is ideal for creating those slightly more delicate lines. Whether it’s sketching, illustrating or writing that you’re into – or anything else which requires attention to detail, for that matter. A fineliner gives handwriting a crisper, clearer look, especially small handwriting. Fineliners come in a range of different colours and the line widths tend to be under 0.7mm, with the finest being 0.3mm.

Technical Pens

If you’re looking for that perfect finish, technical pens are available to do just that. These pens are favoured by architects, draughtsmen and engineers. They give a precise line and are ideal for use on a range of surfaces, including tracing paper, vellum drawing paper and line board. Most technical pens are refillable with replacement nibs often available. They come in a variety of line widths ranging from the superfine 0.mm to a much thicker 1.0mm. You could opt for one of our Rotring sets which contain the basics to get you started.

Fountain Pens

Fountain pens are viewed by many as being one of the most luxurious ways to put pen to paper. They work using gravity and capillary action to get the ink through the feed and onto the paper via the nib. Fountain pens offer a smooth continuous ink flow and very little pressure is needed when writing.

The nibs are usually made from stainless steel or gold and are available in a range of sizes: fine, medium and bold. The more expensive fountain pens come in beautiful designs which are often considered treasured items by their owners.

The methods of getting ink into a fountain pen vary, although the easiest and most convenient way is via a replaceable cartridge. Other refill methods use bottled ink which, although they offer a wider range of inks and colours, are less convenient for using on the go. When you’ve found the fountain pen you wish to purchase, it’s always a good idea to research which method it uses to ensure it is compatible with your lifestyle and requirements.  

Disposable fountain pens are also available and are suitable for everyday use. These pens are not refillable but still provide you with a smooth, enjoyable writing experience. They come with an iridium ball nib and sizes range from 0.7mm to 0.3mm. The Pentel JM20 has a duel sided nib in sizes from 0.3mm to 0.4mm, allowing you to adjust it to suit your own personal preference and style.

Highlighters

These pens are used for highlighting text and come in bright fluorescent colours, bringing text to the attention of the reader with ease. Most highlighters have a chiselled tip which produces a broad line through the text but can be used to achieve a finer line when underlining. Line widths range from 1mm to 5mm, making highlighting text of any size an easy task.

OHP Pens

Over-head projector (OHP) pens are designed to write on OHP film but are also suitable to use on most other glossy surfaces.

OHP pens offer both a permanent and non-permanent option. If you’re looking to make your presentation colourful and eye-catching you could opt for one of our assorted colour packs which include some, or all, of the following colours: black, blue, red, orange, green, brown, purple and yellow. You can choose from a wide range of line widths, including: 0.4mm, 0.6mm, 0.8mm, 1mm and 3mm.

Pencils

Pencils are made from a mixture of graphite and clay which is then placed into a protective casing, most commonly wood, or in the case of a mechanical pencil – plastic or metal.

However, a pencil is not just a pencil. Any artist who uses pencils regularly will be interested in the hardness of the lead, which ranges from hard (2H, 3H, 4H, 5H, 6H, 7H, 8H, 9H,) to black (B, 2B, 3B, 4B, 5B, 6B, 7B, 8B, 9B). HB is the most common type of pencil, used for most everyday writing tasks. 9H is the hardest and will leave the lightest mark on paper, while 9B is the softest and will leave the darkest mark on paper.

Colouring pens and pencils

A popular drawing tool for both children and adults, colouring pencils are available in either round or hexagonal barrels. You can choose from the standard colouring pencil or the blendable colouring pencil which helps you create those softer edges, and water colour pencils which give your creations a stunning water colour paint effect when brush strokes of water are added.

We also stock long lasting felt tip pens that come in both broad and fine tips, available in a vast range of colours.  These are washable, making them the ideal choice for school children, whether in the classroom or at home.

Crayons are particularly suitable for children as they are hard wearing, cover large areas and will not create any unwanted mess. They can be sharpened so you can keep them in tip top condition and are also erasable. They are available in a range of bright, eye catching colours …. Let those imaginations run wild.

Refills

Everyone has their one special pen – their first choice when they dip into the pen pot. Once you’ve found yours, you’ll want to know how to refill it so that you can use it for ever and ever and ever….

We stock a selection of refills including Parker, Waterman, Cross and Rotring. Refills are available for ballpoints, rollerballs and technical pens. Fountain pen refills are available in the form of both cartridges and bottled ink.

Either check the packaging, or look at the refill inside your pen to find out which type your pen requires. Most ballpoints, rollerballs and gel pens simply need to be unscrewed for refill purposes. Take care when refilling so you don’t lose any springs or other small parts that the pen may contain.

Refilling a fountain pen which uses a disposable cartridge is straight forward. The cartridge is simply pushed on, piercing the top and allowing the ink to escape. Check the packaging to find out which cartridges are compatible with your pen.

The refill process can sometimes be a little more complicated (or more fun, depending on how you look at it) with a fountain pen which uses bottled ink. These fountain pens may need to be filled via the piston mechanism, which uses suction, or manually via a syringe.

Choosing the line width

The line width you choose for your pen will depend on personal preference and the type of work you intend to use your pen for. Line widths range from a very thin 0.1mm on fineliners, all the way up to a 14.8mm on pens such as markers. The average size of a medium point pen is around 0.7mm or 0.8mm, so that’s a good starting point when deciding how thick or thin you’d like your lines to be.

MYNT3D Printing Pen

Looking for the best 3D pen and reviews? Read our guide to the best 3D pens of 201for kids, hobbyists, and artists.

Whether you’re a kid, a hobbyist, or an artist, a 3D pen is a fun and innovative tool. It can enhance your creativity and help you get a better understanding of three-dimensional objects.

Reasons To Use A Pen Over A Printer

A printer is accurate and rigid and helps you make virtual designs of objects you want to create whereas a pen is fluid and free-type which supports freestyle hand-drawings. Printers need a 3D file to give form to something whereas pens enable users to draw any object or structure out of their imagination.

Ways to use a 3D printing pen

There is a lot that you can do with 3D pens. They can be used for artistic and decorative works; and also for minor repair works when combined with 3D printers. The most common applications of 3D printing pens include building mini Eiffel towers, homes, ornaments, pendants, and drawing objects like phones, laptops, and iPhone cases.

Scribbler 3D Printing Pen V3

As the name suggests, Scribbler 3D printing pen Vis an advanced version of the popular Scribbler Pen, and it has been in the market for quite some time grabbing the attention of many art lovers worldwide. One of the most striking features of this pen is that it is built with great design and impressive ergonomics which make drawing a lot easy and fun-filled.

Scribbler 3D printing pen Vcomes in multiple colors, but even if you are a beginner, you can save yourself endless hours of research and comparison by using shades of different colors in the same pen. At present, the 3D pen comes in eight attractive colors which include yellow, blue, green, white, red, and purple.

We tried the pen and found out a few things from a user’s perspective. The pen is extremely lightweight and easy to use. We’d say it’s a great choice for kids, teens, and beginners. If you have problems in changing the filament, just skip the process. The pen is designed to easily work without causing any fuss.

Now, find out how you can become an awesome artist by using the Scribbler Pen.

Frankly speaking, Scribbler 3D Pen Vdoesn’t have any major downsides as such. It passed most of our tests with flying colors. But, first-time 3D pen users might struggle a bit because the drawing is different from what you are accustomed to practicing all these years, so you need to learn how to use 3D pen for drawing before you start using them. That apart, the pen is awesome. Fun and learning guaranteed!

Negative

Lix 3D Smart Pen – Extremely lightweight and responsive

Lix shook the 3D world when it launched the smallest 3D printing pen in the world. It’s one of those pens that got appreciation from both fans and critics. Our team was lucky to get one and be able to review this stunning 3D printing pen, which was initially launched through the company’s kickstarter campaign.

So, are you curious to know what our impressions are about this pint-sized 3D pen? Read on and find out the details.

Just like you, we were thinking how this ridiculously small pen would perform, but in the end, we were pleasantly surprised by how well the pen scored in our review tests. We ran multiple tests even using the pen in a quiet environment to see if it was like one of the other noisy pens out there in the market, but it proved to be one that is perfectly suited to be used in quiet places and any environment for that matter. The handle is pretty impressive, and the pen worked well in almost all surfaces that we used.

One of the other noticeable characteristics of the Lix 3D smart pen is the fact that it is works via a USB cable which is different from the other 3D pens that required a power brick for power. That calls for constant plugging, which can be a bit frustrating for some users. If you are like me, then you’ll enjoy using Lix 3D printing pen conveniently without any hassle. The pen remains charged for until it is powered up by the power source. If you wish to charge your Lix 3D smart pen on the go, then a power bank will do the job for you. Super easy, right?

When going through a review, it’s natural that you will want to weigh the pros and cons before purchasing the product. But trust me, despite conducting multiple tests, I couldn’t find any drawback of the Lix 3D printing pen. It looks to be a clear winner and a perfect choice for 3D pen lovers and Lix fans alike. It’s certainly one that is worth buying.

CCbetter Intelligent Pen

Before we get into the details of CCbetter Intelligent Pen, please note that it is also called Joyluxy Intelligent 3D. We’d like to start off saying that this is definitely right up there as one of the most complete 3D pens 201in the market, and we’re excited to review it. When it comes to features and performance, the pen has all the elements that any 3D pen lover would look for in a top notch pen. Let’s review Joyluxy’s

CCbetter Intelligent 3D printing pen in depth.

The pen is packed in a relatively thin box that is only as big as a smartphone box. In the box, there is the regular power brick with the two packed filaments. However, as mentioned earlier, users who prefer new filaments can always purchase them separately.

The makers have included a stand in the kit in which users can put their pens on when not in use. Going by user-friendliness and performance, we would say the pen is easily suitable for beginners and regular users alike. We tried drawing on a range of surfaces, and the pen performed extremely well in all of them. It also includes an OLED which has something like a status indicator to alert the user when the filament gets heated up and is ready for drawing. It’s sure a tough competitor to all the other 3D pens in the market.

Coming to the downside, we didn’t find any noticeable flaw when we started using the pen. However, from a common user’s perspective, we felt that a more detailed user manual would be highly beneficial for beginners and more so for people who are hesitant to go for 3D pens without clear instructions. That apart, we would say that the pen performed very well in several tests.

Taking the pros and cons into account, it still looks like Joyluxy’s CCBetter Intelligent 3D Pen is one of the most impressive pens of its type in the market, and certainly worth putting your money into.

Doodler 3D Printing Pen

I wouldn’t deny that there is a learning curve the user has to go through before using this pen like a pro. Don’t get carried away by the videos you see on YouTube, it’s not that simple. You’ll need a cardboard, paper, or any other surface to draw (and probably a cup of coffee) for a brisk start.

Okay, shifting our focus to the important things, 3Doodler 3D printing pen is amazing for a number of reasons. The first and foremost is that it consists of 50 plastic filaments. Design-wise and feel-wise, the pen is cool. Whether it’s worth the price or not, here is a fair review.

First off, we found that the pen’s name is unique and it is also the world’s first 3D printing pen. When it comes to appearance, it pen looks better than most other 3D pens that we have seen over the days. When drawing, the filaments don’t get clogged – there are 50 of them and replacement is easy.

First off, we found that the pen’s name is unique and it is also the world’s first 3D printing pen. In terms of appearance, it looks better than most other 3D pens that we have seen over the days. While drawing, the filaments don’t get clogged – there are 50 of them and replacement is damn easy.

We tried drawing on multiple surfaces, and the pen worked just fine on all of them. It’s user-friendly. If you are an experienced user, you’ll be at ease when using the pen, and if you are a beginner, then there is a bit of learning curve to go through. However, it’s fun and engaging.

Frankly speaking, there is nothing to complain about with this pen. You might want to do some nitpicking from a critic’s standpoint but again, this pen overcomes the drawbacks that we find in most other 3D Pens.

Coming back to

Glyby Intelligent 3D pens, we would say that kids in your home are going to love this one more than the other 3D pens. It has sufficient features to keep them immersed in a world of joy for a long time. But, if your kids are too young, then make sure to supervise them so that things don’t go wrong.

There is no major drawback about Glyby Intelligent 3D printing pen as such. Since it’s designed for the kids, it does a great job in being a kid’s best 3D friend. Of course, there is a range of other 3D printing pens out there in the market, but most of them are expensive, so Glyby Intelligent 3D printing pen takes the cake when you bring in the budget factor. If you wish to surprise your kids with a perfect birthday present, reward them for scoring high marks in exams, or help them learn some amazing stuff, then this pen should make a great choice.

Additional Features

As we all know, the primary purpose of using a 3D pen is to draw beautiful structures out of creativity. Design, ease of handling, filament conversion, and performance are among the most important things you need to compare among different 3D pens. These are the standard parameters in 3D pens comparison. To go a step further, make sure to look for add-ons like the standby mode and cooling type which can help you differentiate the best from the ordinary. Even bigger LCD screens can come in handy depending on your requirements. Then, there is the new filament jamming alert feature in some pens to let users control things at just the right time. There are also other options like LED and thermal management in smart 3D pens. Let’s take a more elaborate look at some of them.  Type of control

The better the control your 3D pen gives you, the better is its quality. For example, there are pens where there is a temperature control option to melt the plastic filament for better drawing. Even the speed is controllable while drawing. Some pens have a custom feed that help you control the speed and flow of filament while drawing. It is said that adjustable temperature makes drawings more targeted and advanced which was a limitation in the early model 3D pens. Overall, features related to control are only designed to take your 3D drawing experience to a whole new level.  Design

When it comes to design, an ergonomic design is what every user is looking for when buying 3D pens at present. But yeah, models like the Lix haven’t met their expectations in this area yet. Slimmer 3D models are more popular among buyers than bulky 3D pens. The finest pens are super lightweight and pocket-sized and can even be recharged with the USB cable. Design is what determines your handle, and makes you feel good as you draw using your 3D pen. Having a lightweight, easy to grip 3D pen will only help translate your ideas smoothly in the form of 3D objects in the air and on surfaces.  The Filament

What filament type you use also determines the output of your drawing to a large extent. From the way you hold the pen to which grip you should be using, the filament type determines a range of factors. The plastic in the filament is what melts and allows you to draw different objects. Today there are dozens of them out there, so you can always compare and choose the one which best suits your needs. Best of all, filaments are replaceable and so if you are not happy with the one in your 3D pen, you can always buy a better filament separately. Readily replaceable filaments are said to last longer than those that aren’t. Keep in mind that there are four major types of filaments in the market. They are specialty, standard, composite, and flexible.  Brand and manufacturer

Yes, brand name makes a big difference when it comes to buying 3D pens. The world’s first 3D printing pen was introduced by 3Doodler and Scribbler topped it up with a 6-month warranty to encourage new users to try the model out. Lix went the extra mile in terms of innovation. Likewise, every brand has been and is unique in its own way. Before buying a 3D pen, make sure that you compare the top brands and the best range of 3D pen models from each brand. This will help you make a better purchasing decision even if you are a first-time buyer.  Customer Reviews

What the first thing you do before purchasing a product? Check online reviews? Well, hold on a bit. That might not be the only way to find the best 3D printing pen for your need. Each pen has its own reputation in the market and choosing the best all depends on what you want and whether your pen has it all. It’s never a bad idea to browse online reviews, but word of mouth would be much better. If any of your friends or colleagues has bought a 3D pen and is happy to recommend the one to you, then it’s worth buying. Of course, after checking if it fulfills your requirements in terms of design, features, performance, and budget.

The Bad and The Ugly

Not all rOtring listings that look really good on the outside are quite as they seem.  I’ve had a couple of pens I’ve purchased arrive at my door with a few imperfections that could make or break a deal for someone.  

NOS 600 “gears” on left and heavily used and worn on the right.

With the 600s particularly, where the caps and barrels meet there are little “gears” so to speak that force these parts to line up.  Well, an unfortunate flaw in these gears is that they wear down over time with long-term use.  The cap and barrel may not have a scratch on them, but if the pen was used a lot during its time even with great care, these parts eventually start to become a bit loose.  I purchased a silver 600 rollerball that was flawless on the outside, but once it arrived I noticed that the cap and barrel were a bit wiggly.  The pen still works, but isn’t a nice snap fit like you’d find in a brand new one.  A deal breaker?  Maybe.

Watch it in HD on YouTube.

I read several school supply lists to figure out the most common asked for school supplies. Most lists used the tabs/binder method. I hated the the binder method. I ditched the binder in high school for a folder and notebook system. I was so happy to be rid of the binder and hole punching. I’m left handed. School supplies/desks/scissors – it’s tough being left handed. 

I’m going to start this post by saying I’m not a teacher. If you’re wondering why you should buy something, just ask. If they ask for glue sticks, buy glue sticks. If they ask for notecards, buy notecards. There will be some disposable items you can’t avoid. And, that’s OK. 

I’m just offering suggestions for school supplies that should last a very long time and disposable items that have a better end life than the landfill.  where to shop?

Your own home!

The first thing you should do is to shop your own house first! How many pens do you have lying around? Do you have any leftover supplies from last year? I remember always having leftover school supplies. (I also remember hardly using a lot of stuff on these lists – mini-stapler anyone?)

Backpack or Messenger Bag

This is a school supply that can be used year after year. I still have my backpack from the the 8th grade. It was a very well made Ralph Lauren backpack. I just took it on my camping trip and it’s been with me on every flight as my carry-on.

If you’re looking for a backpack, messenger bag, or laptop bag lean towards something that has a lifetime guarantee like Kippling* or Jansport*.  

These are great items to find second hand often times they’ll still honor the warranty. 

Lunchbag

This is another item you should only have to buy once or twice K-1In college you don’t really need a lunch box. Although hindsight, having a little metal tiffin to keep in my bag would have been a great idea. I could have snuck out a lot of cookies.  

Pencil Sharpener

I’m so confused… Do schools not have pencil sharpeners in the classrooms anymore?

Those little ones you keep in your book bag hardly work anyway. I’d just get an electronic pencil sharpener to keep at your desk at home and sharpen your pencils before you go to school. 

Ruled Index Cards

Some people love note cards; it’s how they learn best. They’re not my favorite. I like to write a question and answer on a piece of lined paper. Then I use another piece of paper to hide the answer. It’s a similar effect. I’ve only seen note cards wrapped in plastic.

Ring Binder Hole Punch

I remember these things never lasted very long. But, I couldn’t find any alternative to the classic plastic hole punch*. I guess just hope for the best, and pray that it lasts long enough to use for a couple of years! 

Stapler

Ok, but once again, why do we need a tiny stapler? They only time I can think of stapling a page is to turn in a paper. Couldn’t you have stapled it before you went to class? 

If you had to have something portable, I would get one of these cute staple-less staplers.* It makes it easy to recycle or compost your papers.

Scribbler

3D Pen Vwith LED Screen which is one of the most popular 3D Pen for kids. We are sure that your child will like its cool design and attractive ceramic body. It is very smooth and extremely lightweight which makes it perfect for any kid to use and have fun with. painting could be quite expensive, but with a 3D pen, you can make them on your own at a lower cost. If you are new to this technology and wish to find best 3d printing pen in a jiffy, we suggest you checkout table below which has all “the best 3Dprinting pens 2018”. So, don’t waste much time, order the one to create enjoyable and fun filled 3D printings. If you want to know more about the above mentioned “the best 3D printing pens 2018”? You can read the article below for a quick review of each and every product. In this article we have tried to cover each and everything that you or any other buyer would want to know before choosing a 3d pen.

OLED Display

It is equipped with a huge Organic Light-emitting Diode (OLED) display that helps users to monitor the temperature and to improve the quality of the pictures being drawn.

This professional 3D printing pen is easy to use and allows every user to bring a 3D printing masterpiece.

It has a good speed control with modification option.

It has a sleek and attractive design which is preferred by home users for making good 3d drawings.

Flexibility is its next advantage! With this pen, you can draw anything from small to big size image.

It allows everyone to show off the innovation by discovering a new level of creativeness.

It is highly portable as a wall charger come along with this pen which is easy carry when you are walking from place to another.

It also stays for a longer duration without wasting filament and experiencing any difficulty.

Its manual includes minimum information on how to use it and the way its nozzle and temperature are adjusted.

Another drawback is poor branding as in the name of the brand is not mentioned on the front side of the pen.

Doodle in All ways

You can draw horizontally, vertically and in all other directions to take your imagination off the page. It expels liquid plastic, which hardens immediately in air or on paper. It has endless possibilities to draw your imagination a reality.

User-Friendly Design with Control System

The design of the 7Tech 3D printing pen is user-friendly and greatly helps to improve the users level of creativity. It has a speed control system that controls the filament flow.

Users can keep a slower extrusion rate for making an intricate painting and faster extrusion rate for making simpler paintings. Also, its temperature can also be controlled between 160-230 C to allow extruding of both the ABS and PLA filaments.

Operation and Functionality is Very Easy to Understand :-

The functionality of this top 3doodler pen is very simple and easy to understand even though you are a new to 3d printing technology with no prior technological knowledge. For understanding the functionality of this tool, users can read the instruction manual carefully.

LCD Screen Displays All Information

The LCD screen displays information related to temperature, filament, and flow rate. The displayed information enables the user to make changes in the settings as per his/her wish. Changing the parameters can be achieved through a button control system given on the device.

However, the operating power requirements of the pen are least at it’s fully operational level with either DC or AC marking which is highly convenient.

It should be plugged in at all times when in use.

Safety issue could be a primary concern for new users since the temperature of the pen can reach a very high level that can be lead to burning or harm users in other ways.

Painting in the air could be more challenging as compared to a paper or any other flat surface.

Speed Control System and LED

The latest version comes with a speed control system and a bigger LED that makes it easy for any user to control and monitor the speed and temperature of the filament.

With the speed monitoring system, the user will have more control on the performance of the pen as well, and he can make amazing 3D paintings at his/her pace.

Kid-friendly technique

It is a great product because kids can create 3D printing without any risk. They can draw any shape of their choice after inserting the gel cartridge into the pen.

They enjoy the gel flow coming out on the building surface when they peel. They can build different parts of a drawing separately and connect them easily without using glue or heat.

Color Filaments Come along

The GENESIS 3D Printing Pen comes with five ABS plastic filaments. If you want more filaments, you need to purchase from the market. Filaments are available for a variety of different colors. It gives users the freedom of using varied kinds of filaments.

Functions like Glue Gun

Though it is entirely different, but this 3d printer pen has same functionality like a glue gun. You can start using it as a glue gun because it also has an internal heating system to liquefy the solid filament of ABS plastic into liquid form.

Not only can a user of the GENESIS 3D Printing Pen. When you order this 3d doodle pen, you’re in good hands with our no-risk, no-questions-asked Money Back Guarantee and Top-Rated customer service.

ABS Filament

Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS) is another high demand filament types! It is the same kind of plastic used in bicycle helmets and LEGO bricks. This is little cheap, flexible and durable than PLA. Most importantly it can be easily extruded and a perfect choice for 3D printing. The downside of ABS filament includes; It needs a high-temperature range between 210°C to 250°C to reach the melting point. It releases intense fumes during printing so not suitable for people with breathing issues.

Design

The design of the 3D doodle pen is another primary concern! It plays a key role as it will increase the importance of the selected pen to the users. Comfortable design allows users to access the pen easily with a good feel on hand. However ergonomic design 3D printer pens are preferred choice in the current scenario.They are slimmer and easy to hold 3D pens that you can carry along all the time with zero hassle.

Control System

If the control of a 3D pen is in your hand, it will help you to draw high-quality 3D images hassle free! You can control the temperature of the filament you have loaded in pen. You can control the speed of the drawing out the liquid that may help you to draw refine lines with comfort and ease. The adjustable control system will change the entire look of 3D artwork and appeal a massive number of customers.

Power Source

As the heating process is required to activate all 3D printing pens, so they must have power sources too. Most of these tools need to plug in the power point. Whereas, LIX 3D Pen can work quickly with chargeable batteries. They can be connected to AC power supply for aregular performance.

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Pen Refills by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your Pen Refills wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of Pen Refills

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about Pen Refills is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



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