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Best Tent Cards 2018 – [Buyer’s Guide]

Last Updated December 1, 2018
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Billy JacobsHi, I’m Billy Jacobs. After more than 27 hours of research, including interviewing two experts and spending 10 hours testing 21 popular tent cards, I found the best tent cards of 2018.

I will go through the main features and what you should consider when deciding which one to pick over the other. In this article, I’ve listed down the Top 3 list. These are the best tent cards your money can buy.

Best Tent Cards of 2018

If you get well acquainted with these basics, you shouldn’t have a problem choosing a tent cards that suits your need. If you’re reading this, it is very likely that you’re scouting for the best tent cards. I’ve based my selection methodology on customer feedback, the size, functionality, and budget to meet various demands. I make the search easier for you, by reviewing the best tent cards on the market.

Test Results and Ratings

Rank №1 №2 №3
Product
Total 4.8 4.5 4.3
Ease of use
5 points
5 points
4 points
Versatility
5 points
5 points
4 points
Durability
5 points
4 points
5 points
Quality
4 points
4 points
4 points
Awards 1
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№1 – Blank Metallic Vista Place Cards Tent Cards – 50 Pack | Size 3.5″ x 5″ Flat 2.5″ x 3.5″ Folded

 
Blank Metallic Vista Place Cards Tent Cards - 50 Pack | Size 3.5

Pros
Color- Metallic Vista
Quantity- 50 pack
Size- 2.5″x3.5″ (folded) 3.5″x5.5″ (flat)
Cons
Nothing, except that I wasted too much time making my choice.
 
Total:
4.8

Why did this tent cards win the first place?

The product is very strong. Its material is stable and doesn’t crack. I don’t know anything about other models from this brand, but I am fully satisfied with this product. I was completely satisfied with the price. Its counterparts in this price range are way worse. I really enjoy the design. It is compact, comfortable and reliable. And it looks amazing!

banner2


Ease of use
5

5star

Versatility
5

5star

Durability
5

5star

Quality
4

4star

 

 

№2 – Blank Brown Place Cards Tent Cards – 50 Pack | Size 3.5″ x 5″ Flat 2.5″ x 3.5″ Folded

 
Blank Brown Place Cards Tent Cards - 50 Pack | Size 3.5

Pros
Color- Brown
Quantity- 50 pack
Size- 2.5″x3.5″ (folded) 3.5″x5.5″ (flat)
Cons
It is not for the small jobs.
It seems not very durable.
 
Total:
4.5

Why did this tent cards come in second place?

The material is pretty strong and easy to wash if needed. This is a pretty decent product that perfectly fitted the interior of our office. I recommend you to consider buying this model, it definitely worth its money. Managers explained me all the details about the product range, price, and delivery.

banner2


Ease of use
5

5star

Versatility
5

5star

Durability
4

4star

Quality
4

4star

 

 

№3 – Avery 5302 Small Tent Card

 
Avery 5302 Small Tent Card

Pros
Laser/Inkjet Tent Cards.
Quick and easy to use.
40 sheets with 4 cards on each sheet.
Cons
Fairly expensive.
Need frequent maintenance.
 
Total:
4.3

Why did this tent cards take third place?

It doesn’t squeaks nor bents. Looks great in my apartment. I liked the design. We’ve been using it for 2 months and it still looks like brand new. I hope that the good reputation of the manufacturer will guarantee a long-term work. This price is appropriate since the product is very well built.

banner2


Ease of use
4

4star

Versatility
4

4star

Durability
5

5star

Quality
4

4star

 

 

Tent Cards Buyer’s Guide

If you keep the before points in mind, you can easily go out to the market and buy tent cards, right? No!

Tent Material

Tents are still the most popular means of camping though camping pods are becoming more popular. They are commonly made of fabrics like cotton (canvas), nylon or polyester. These materials are suitable for different types of tents and all have their advantages and disadvantages. Indeed manufacturers often combine mixtures of these materials in order to combine the benefits.

Polyester

Unlike nylon polyester made tents can withstand long periods in the sun. It is also slightly thicker and more durable than nylon. Do look out for those that specify they include a breathable coating to keep water out but allow air flow otherwise they can suffer from condensation build up and also be stuffy inside.

There are numerous tent shapes you should be aware of. Which you should choose will depend on your intended use and the type of weather you plan to use the tent in. For example a family tent would generally be larger and taller for full height access whereas a season tent for winter use would be lower and more aerodynamic in order to stand up to the elements.

Dome-shaped tent

Windy conditions will always pose a problem for campers particularly when it comes to erecting a tent. To make life easier in terms of camping in windy or snowy conditions consider a dome shaped tent. These are really simple to assemble and generally stable due to the 2, or pole system they employ. The poles criss-cross and pass through the center of the roof creating an arched ceiling with a square, hexagonal or octagonal footprint. At head height this creates lots of room because of that they are one of the most popular purchased tents on the market. Some models also offer separate sleeping rooms or a porch for storage.

Season Tents

This type of tent is perfect for any condition. Whether you get rain in the evening and hot sunlight at noon, these are for variety of seasons including winter. These are structured to handle strong winds with mesh and ventilation-type walls that keeps you protected from insects but still gives you good air circulation when inside. One of its most common types is the summer tent, which is designed to have great air-circulation or ventilation inside. It features large net bindings that give free air circulation when uncovering its fly. This spares you from being bugged out during summer seasons, too. Also, this is best for rainy days since it is built with a strong skeletal system and full-coverage rain flies that can withstand weather like summer thunderstorms

Convertible tent

If you are the type of a camper who explores camping grounds in any type of condition, you must therefore be a perfect match for this convertible tent. Whether you are on a summer trip or on a stormy adventure, this gives you options with the following features like poles, vestibules and a rainfly. It features solid nylon panels and mesh windows on its walls that you can zip up. It is heavier in weight, thus making it sturdier and more versatile than the other types.

Tarp tent

Bug protection is also sacrificed. Many use a tarp tent in conjunction with a bivy tent or hammock beneath. They use the tarp simply for overhead protection from exposure to sunlight or rain.

If you’re planning a trip up Everest or Kanytime soon then chances are you’ll want to take a Geodesic tent. These are generally the most stable designs on the market. Support poles criss-cross over the surface creating a triangular panel type structure. For windy or extreme weather conditions these are your best bet. Geodesic or semi-geodesic designs are for those who take camping seriously and perhaps go it alone or with a friend, so not really suited to the family camping market.

Tent Weight

Weight is often the most talked about variable. It’s easy to quantify, and you’ll feel it every step of the trip. But there’s actually not much of a weight spread in today’s tents. The lightest backpacking tents usually weigh just under two pounds per-person, while the most budget-friendly tents usually weigh less than three pounds per person. That’s less than one fuel bottle or the difference between an empty and half-full water bottle. It’s not a lot. (Erin Wilson)

Ease of Setup

Nothing’s more frustrating at the end of a long day than wrestling tent poles into position or even worse, setting a tent up wrong and having to start again. Things that make set up faster and easier include: color-coded poles, grommets and webbing, symmetrical designs, simple pole structures, and poles that attach to the vestibule rather than the tent.

The easiest tents are domes or A-frames. With only two or three straight poles, they’re simple but the compromise is elbow room. Multiple hubs and pre-bent pole structures, on the other hand, are often confusing the first time you set them up, but get you more room. (Josie Boulding) (Josie Boulding)  Most tents use a two-layer structure, where the poles attach to the tent body and then the fly is clipped over the tent. A faster pitch style of tent is one where the fly and tent are integrated and the poles attach outside the fly. This eliminates one step in the setup and keeps the inside of the tent dry when setting up or taking down in the rain.

How poles attach to the tent matters, too. Few tents use sleeves anymore because pushing and pulling the poles through the tubes of fabric often results in snags or the poles coming apart. Instead, clips are now the standard and what we recommend because they’re fast and secure. The binding, where the poles attach to the tent, can vary from a simple ring to a ball and socket system that snaps together. The latter are nice, especially for solo setups, because the pole won’t pop out unexpectedly.

Free-standing tents are the best: once they’re set up they stand on their own without the need for pegs and ropes. They’re easy to set up, even by yourself, and can be picked up and moved. Non-freestanding tents need to be pegged and use ropes to tension at least some, if not all the walls. With fewer poles, they tend to be less expensive and lighter weight, but require more fiddling and sometimes help from another person.

Choose Your Size

The first step in determining which 2-in-is right for you is to figure out how big of a device you need. Are you a student who wants something that’s easy to toss in a bag and carry to class, the library and back home again? Or do you want something with a large screen that can be used to give presentations without the need to connect to a projector, or simply want a big display for watching movies in bed?  2-in-1s range from 10-inch models, which are the best for on-the-go types; to all-purpose hybrids between 1and 1inches, like the Microsoft Surface Pro and the ; to giant models like

HP’s supersize 15-inch Spectre x360 that will probably spend most of their lives inside.

HP Spectre xand the

Dell XPS 1, which feature tablet bodies that house all of the components and ports, and can be used with separate keyboards (often via magnets) in order to provide the traditional keyboard-plus-touchpad experience. You can stash away the keyboard to save weight and space, and then connect it again at a moment’s notice when the situation requires it. In addition to detaching completely, many removable keyboards can also bend and fold to become kickstands or protective covers when the situation arises.

However, if you do a lot of writing or prefer a touchpad for navigating the user interface, you may want to opt for a bendable 2-in-Systems such as Lenovo’s Yoga 900 and HP’s Spectre x360 have hinges that bend back a full 360 degrees to go into tablet mode and also offer intermediary positions such as tent and presentation modes.

Get the Right Processor and Specs

Most 2-in-1s feature an Intel processor, but thanks to the company’s relatively simple naming scheme, it’s not too difficult to target the kind of performance you’re seeking.

The highest-power systems feature an Intel Core ior mchip. The main differences between the two are that the msacrifices a bit of speed in exchange for a little extra battery life, and it doesn’t need fans for cooling.

Midrange models often have Core i3, i5, mand mCPUs, which offer a good balance between price and performance. Devices with these CPUs are good for most productivity scenarios and can serve up some casual gaming in a pinch as well.

Then, you get Intel Celeron and Atom CPUs, which are found on a lot of budget hybrids. While their performance isn’t superimpressive, it’s more than good enough for people who just want a device for answering emails, browsing the Web or watching Netflix.

4GB of RAM is standard on almost every 2-in-nowadays, but 8GB is better if you can afford it. Refrain from going up to 16GB unless you’re doing some serious work that really demands the extra memory, as the added performance isn’t worth the cost for most people.

For storage, solid-state drives (SSDs) offer the best performance, but if you’re looking to save a few bucks, you can opt for a traditional hard disk, which is more common among less expensive systems. Many budget systems also feature eMMC (embedded multimedia card) flash storage, which is essentially a stack of SD cards attached to the motherboard. eMMC storage rarely matches the speed of an SSD, but it does offer significant cost savings. And for systems that rely on cloud storage instead of saving local files, the performance increase might not be worth it.

Don’t Skimp on Screen Resolution

The most affordable 2-in-hybrids have 136x 768-pixel displays, but we strongly prefer sharper 1920 x 1080 full-HD screens. With these panels, you’ll enjoy better image quality and the ability to snap two wide windows side by side for some serious multitasking.

Some models have even higher-resolution quad-HD (2560 x 1440 pixels) or ultra-HD (3840 x 2160) displays, which offer more detail and are better choices for people who do photo or video editing. Ultra-HD is the same resolution as the 4K content that’s becoming more widely available both in Blu-ray discs and online, so it makes this the resolution of choice for movie fiends as well. The major drawback of higher-resolution panels is that they suck up more power, so it’s important to consider how important battery life is to you.

The Insider Pick

With a good tent, you can always feel at home, even when you’re actually miles from civilization and a few thousand feet up in the mountains. The Mountainsmith Morrison EVO Person tent is our top choice for best tent, thanks to its great price, ease of setup, and ability to keep you warm and dry even in bad weather.

I was sitting on rough-hewn log bench when the first raindrops started to fall. Fortunately, I had the thick thatched roof of a decades-old hut over my head, a hut built to endure the lashing storms of the South American rainforest through which the team and I were hiking. With a steaming bowl of rice on my lap and the day’s trek completed, I was looking forward to eating my fill and then sinking into that pure slumber that follows an exhausting day.

Even as the rainfall grew heavy, not a single drop penetrated the woven palm and reed ceilings or floor of the dusty old hut. The same was not true, however, for my teammate Mark’s tent. He burst into the hut carrying his pack, sleeping bag, pad, and other gear in his arms, swearing loudly and exclaiming: “That damn tent is useless! Everything’s soaked!”

I leaped up to take some of the gear from his arms, but then it occurred to me that, hey, he and I used the exact same brand of tent… and that meant that my hiking pack, sleeping bag, air mat, my clothing and camera, my book and maps, and everything else I had with me on this ten day trip were likely in the process of being soaked through. I ran from the hut and through the downpour only to find that, sure enough, most of my gear was already soaked. I grabbed everything I could, thankfully got some help from the others, and stumbled back into the hut, where I would be spending the night instead of in my cozy tent.

As frustrating as that experience was, it was more my fault than a matter of gear failure. In later reading up on the tent I was using, I learned that it was designed primarily for high alpine use in freezing conditions. Snow, wind, and frigid temperatures were no problem for it, but heavy rains would soak it through unless it was used with an added rainfly.

Bike fitting

A quick 30–3minutes of service, determined at the assessment.

For when your bike hasn’t had a tune-up after a season of active riding or seasons of light use: noisy drivetrain, imprecise shifting, loose feeling brakes, or generally loose feeling components. Includes everything in minor adjustment, plus:

For when your bike hasn’t had a tune-up after a few seasons of regular riding or it hasn’t been use for over a year: poor shifting, soft brakes, or wheels aren’t straight. Includes everything in basic tune-up, plus:

Top-notch service and it’s ready fast. Includes everything in Advanced Plus, along with:

Ski services

When you buy or more of the big items (skis, boots or bindings), we’ll mount your bindings for free. This offer applies to all types of ski equipment sold at MEC, and proof of purchase is required. If you’re shopping online, you can take advantage of this deal by placing your order via phone at 1.888.847.0770 or 604.876.6221.

Repairs

Zippers, jackets, packs, bikes, snowshoes – if it needs repairing, there’s a good chance we can help fix it (or know someone who can). Everything you buy from MEC is covered by our Rocksolid Guarantee. Make sure your gear is clean before you bring it by for us to take a look.

Green building features

MEC arrived in the Atlantic region in 200with our Halifax store. We moved into an existing building and used as many of the on-site structural elements as possible. While this store wasn’t built from the ground up, we still found ways to make small changes that add up to energy savings over time. Here are some of the green features:

Like all MEC buildings, we’re proud to say that this store is carbon neutral. We purchase Green Electricity Certificates and Green Natural Gas Certificates from Bullfrog Power, which means that Bullfrog procures renewable energy (wind, micro-hydro and biogas) on our behalf for electricity and natural gas.

 

 

 

 

How to save up to 86%? Here is little trick.

You must visit the page of sales. Here is the link. If you don’t care about which brand is better, then you can choose the Tent Cards by the price and buy from the one who will offer the greatest discount.

 

 

Final Word

First of all thanks for reading my article to the end! I hope you find my reviews listed here useful and that it allows you to make a proper comparison of what is best to fit your needs and budget. Don’t be afraid to try more than one product if your first pick doesn’t do the trick.

Most important, have fun and choose your Tent Cards wisely! Good luck!

So, TOP3 of Tent Cards

 

 

Questions? Leave a comment below!

Chatting about Tent Cards is my passion! Leave me a question in the comments, I answer each and every one and would love to get to know you better!



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